Tag Archives: #glutenfree

“I don’t know where I’m going from here, but I promise it won’t be boring”- David Bowie

collage-2017-06-08If you go to London, Brixton is a must see place. It’s the last station of the Victoria Line and it’s a pleasure for the eyes as soon as you go out of the Tube, for, just opposite the street, in Tunstall Road, there’s a mural painting of David Bowie made by the Australian artist James Cochran. It’s a personal version of Aladdin Sane’s album cover and I first saw it last year in January, when the place was full of flowers and grieving messages. On January this year it was the same, save for a glass put to protect the artwork.

Bowie was born in Stansfield road in Brixton and there are several places to see if you’re a fan of him or just a music lover, like the Arts Lab, the hair salon where the Ziggy Stardust hair style was created or the park where he performed in 1969. When I was in London there were two different walking tours that offer people an all-encompassing journey from birth to death of one of London’s biggest icons, with passionate guides able to enrich the visit with stories and anecdotes. There’s a 2 hour tour and a 4 hour one that includes a trip to Beckenham, browse the web and look for the most suitable for you.

Brixton of course, it’s not only Bowie, its market is the Europe’s biggest Afro-Caribbean food market. You can get there with just a two minute walk from Brixton tube station: Brixton Village and Market Row (just across the road) are basically a collection of narrow streets called ‘Avenues’ where you can find everything, tasting a large variety of street food and have a good meal for £10. As I’m gluten intolerant, I looked for something for me and it was a pleasure to see there was a wide choice. Beside of the always trustable Honest Burger, I personally tried Sansla creperie and I wasn’t disappointed. Remember to order a galette and not a crepe if you need to avoid gluten. The Banoffee tasted heavenly and the vanilla shake was delicious. Since I want to go back there to visit the windmill, I will surely hit Sansla for a different option. Here’s the link: http://www.senzalacreperie.co.uk/

In addition to all the open market stalls, the area is full of shops (included my beloved Poundland) and many interesting things to see (as I stated before, I need to go back to visit all the art galleries and the music shops) like the O2 Academy (or Brixton Academy), that was once a cinema and now it’s an important  centre for live music. The Academy was built in 1929 and still have its wonderful art decò style.

So, if you’re in London, don’t miss this incredible borough.

TRACK OF THE DAY: Guns of Brixton – The Clash

 

 

 

 

“And the city itself was just a glow on the dark earth”- Monica Ali

As I said before, I’ve just read “Brick Lane” by Monica Ali and I totally fell in love with it. I borrowed it from the library only because I liked the title (lately I’m only looking for novels set in London) and it was a positive surprise. It’s a choral novel even if the main point of view is Nazneen’s, a Bangladeshi woman relocated to London through an arranged marriage to a man nearly twice her age. The books tells her story, but also many other of the people of Bangladeshi origin she meets, with a look on what happens in her country of origin through what’s happening to her sister Hasina. The book is not properly set in Brick Lane, maybe “Mile End” would have been a better title, but if you’re familiar to that part of East London, there are many places that can be easily recognised. The plot is pleasant and interesting, characters are well depicted, the descriptions are vivid and the reader’s interest is always kept alive. I loved seeing the main character growth: at first she’s submitted to her husband, unhappy and prefer taking refuge into her past and happy childhood rather than taking pleasure in daily life. Then she learns English, she starts earning her own money, she gets a lover who helps her to see over the four walls of her apartment. In the end she realizes who she is and what she wants to be, so she gets rid both of her husband and lover and opens a sewing workshop with some friends of her and finally fullfill her desire to ice-skating even in a sari.

If you want to visit Brick Lane you have to hop off at Aldgate and walk for a 5 minutes. Besides of the street art, the first thing that strikes the attention is the Old Truman brewery once home to London’s largest brewery and now location to a hive of creative businesses like independent shops, galleries, markets (only at the weekends), bars and restaurants.

2017-17-3--14-20-24

If you keep walking along this long lane, you will find The cereal killer cafe that sells over 100 different types of cereal from around the world. You can eat there and they have vegan and gluten free options.

Another well known place is the Beigel shop, open 24/7 whose menu is focused on beigels (not bagels, it keeps the yddish pronunciation) baked in the traditional Jewish style (it’s being boiled in water before baking, a step that produces its crisp crust and moist, chewy interior) with  a lot of tasty fillings. It also serves pastries, cakes and sweets as well as white, rye and black bread. It’s not expensive, but it has no gluten free option.

If you raise your eyes, once you pass under the railway bridge, you will see the 123 building that is a four-storey mini department store packed with recycled clothing.

And on the less known part of Brick lane, just crossed Bethnal Green Road, there’s Tatty Devine my favourite handmade jewellery shop, where you can find some original, playful, colourful, laser cut acrylic things. There’s another shop in Covent Garden, but I use to go there.

TRACK OF THE DAY: Brimful of Asha- Cornershop

“You can learn a lot about a woman by getting smashed with her.”-Tom Waits

When in London I use to have an intense nightlife, pity I can’t drink too much since my hiatal hernia doesn’t allow me more than a two glasses on alcohol, the same amount I need to get very drunk.

One of the fanciest places I’ve ever been, is Sketch in Conduit street (a cross street of Regent’s street): an unique place where food, art and music meet. The location is magical: there’s an hopscotch at the entrance (I loved it since it recalled  me Cortàzar’s novel) and various artworks on the walls.

It has five different restaurants and bars:

-The Gallery, where you can have a classy afternoon tea as we did (they also have a gluten free menu) or a dinner; if you’re on a budget I suggest you to check the prices in advance: the food is lovely, but minimal and to me, a bit overpriced. The location, however, is incredible: the monochromatic pink interior contrasts with the witty David Shrigley’s artworks on the wall, since this place is a part of a of a long-term programme of artist-conceived restaurants. The Gallery’s walls host the largest group of original drawings David Shrigley has ever exhibited.

Then there are the three parts of Sketch where we haven’t been yet:

-The Lecture Room & Library that is a two Michelin starred gastronomic restaurant.

-The Parlour where you can have breakfast, afternoon teas and evening drinks.

-The East bar that is an evening bar where to have pre-dining drinks

This year we had an enchanting time at the Glade, drinking exquisite cocktails in this magic woodland bar. On the walls there is a fairy tales découpaged forest and the rattan furniture was maybe a little uncomfortable for my aching body, but absolutely perfect for the location. My cocktail was gorgeous and the company even better. I don’t like too much taking pictures when I’m in a bar or in a restaurant, so here’s only a small view of what Sketch is. If you’re interested you can visit its web site: https://sketch.london/what.php#gsc.tab=0

And here’s comes the reason why Sketch is so popular: its exclusive egg shaped toilets that complete this insane experience.

TRACK OF THE DAY: dRuNk-Zayn